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Denver Century Ride http://denvercenturyride.com Explore. Discover. Experience. Thu, 06 Jul 2017 19:55:33 +0000 en-US hourly 1 http://wordpress.org/?v=4.2.15 Fitness tips and gear to consider when preparing your body in the coming weeks for the Denver Century Ride http://denvercenturyride.com/fitness-tips-gear-consider-preparing-body-coming-weeks-denver-century-ride/ http://denvercenturyride.com/fitness-tips-gear-consider-preparing-body-coming-weeks-denver-century-ride/#comments Fri, 26 May 2017 18:43:34 +0000 http://denvercenturyride.com/?p=4087 Here are some great suggestions from our Endurance Coach, Kim Welk, from Team W Coaching (TeamWCoaching@gmail.com) to get in the saddle. If you are coming off the couch to The Denver Century Ride, here are some great tips to get your body ready and for having a successful ride. Gather necessary equipment Mandatory – Bike and Helmet Equipment check: (A,B,C’s – Air in tires, Brakes functional, Chain Ring – Gears working) Stop into your local bike shop or recreational store for assistance. Sunglasses (lenses) Clothing (Kit) Socks Gloves Cycling Shoes Change of Clothing Arm/leg warmers, cap, gator Other items: Watch Heart Rate Monitor Sunscreen Nutrition – bottles, electrolytes, food Spend some time on the bike – 20 to 30 minutes a few times a week Get used to sitting in the saddle (your sit bones will thank you!) Familiarize yourself with starting and stopping (you need to follow road rules) Familiarize yourself with your gears so you can handle terrain changes Working Out If possible, take a longer ride on the weekend on a course similar to the event – 1 hour A strong core helps balance and stability on the bike so take a few minutes a few times a week to complete the following: Push-Ups, Jump Ropes, Single Leg Step Ups, Body Weight Squats, Forward Lunges. (Ensure proper form and repetitions within your capabilities.) Create a circuit of 8-10 exercises – 1 minute on :30 off repeat 2 times. Thanks Kim for these great suggestions! Check out the Denver Century Ride Facebook page for more information and a segment that aired this morning on KWGN Denver Colorado’s Best with Joana!

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Here are some great suggestions from our Endurance Coach, Kim Welk, from Team W Coaching (TeamWCoaching@gmail.com) to get in the saddle.

If you are coming off the couch to The Denver Century Ride, here are some great tips to get your body ready and for having a successful ride.

  • Gather necessary equipment
    • Mandatory – Bike and Helmet
    • Equipment check: (A,B,C’s – Air in tires, Brakes functional, Chain Ring – Gears working)
      • Stop into your local bike shop or recreational store for assistance.
    • Sunglasses (lenses)
    • Clothing (Kit)
      • Socks
      • Gloves
      • Cycling Shoes
      • Change of Clothing
      • Arm/leg warmers, cap, gator
    • Other items:
      • Watch
      • Heart Rate Monitor
      • Sunscreen
      • Nutrition – bottles, electrolytes, food
  • Spend some time on the bike – 20 to 30 minutes a few times a week
    • Get used to sitting in the saddle (your sit bones will thank you!)
    • Familiarize yourself with starting and stopping (you need to follow road rules)
    • Familiarize yourself with your gears so you can handle terrain changes
  • Working Out
    • If possible, take a longer ride on the weekend on a course similar to the event – 1 hour
    • A strong core helps balance and stability on the bike so take a few minutes a few times a week to complete the following:
      • Push-Ups, Jump Ropes, Single Leg Step Ups, Body Weight Squats, Forward Lunges. (Ensure proper form and repetitions within your capabilities.)
      • Create a circuit of 8-10 exercises – 1 minute on :30 off repeat 2 times.

Thanks Kim for these great suggestions! Check out the Denver Century Ride Facebook page for more information and a segment that aired this morning on KWGN Denver Colorado’s Best with Joana!

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Denver B-Cycle Partners With Denver Century Ride http://denvercenturyride.com/denver-b-cycle-partners-denver-century-ride/ http://denvercenturyride.com/denver-b-cycle-partners-denver-century-ride/#comments Thu, 25 May 2017 21:16:03 +0000 http://denvercenturyride.com/?p=4081 Media Release Media Contacts: Mark Stevens mstevens@ecentral.com 720-328-5488 (office); 303-495-8699 (cell) May 25, 2017 News Release Denver B-Cycle Partners With Denver Century Ride Denver B-cycle today announced a two-year partnership with Coldwell Banker Denver Century Ride, taking place this year on Saturday, June 17 along four courses that each feature excellent bike routes around the Denver metro area.  All four of the route options—100 miles, 85 miles, 50 miles and 25 miles—begin and end at The Shops at Northfield Stapleton (8340 Northfield Blvd.), are fully supported, and allow cyclists to discover Denver by bike as they wind through the city. “The Denver Century Ride showcases how much progress Denver is making as an urban bike city,” said Denver B-cycle executive director Nick Bohnenkamp. “The routes feature some of our best infrastructure and how to get around.  The Century Ride also benefits bicycle organizations that are playing a key role in the ongoing improvements to the region’s bicycle infrastructure—and culture—we appreciate their vision and commitment.” The Denver Century Ride benefits Bicycle Colorado, BikeDenver and Bike Jeffco. All three non-profit organizations advocate for the cycling community through a variety of means. In 2018, Denver B-cycle will be a non-profit partner and benefactor of the 25-mile ride option. The 100-mile route is designed to help cyclists discover how easy it is to get out to the mountains by bike with the Downtown Denver skyline in full view and relish in the proximity of city and country.  The full 100-mile route highlights some of Denver’s bicycle commuter routes and casual riding areas including a challenging climb from Golden through Genesee Park. To register and for complete details regarding routes visit http://denvercenturyride.com/. The day will end with a street party at Northfield Stapleton complete with a variety of food options, beer and beverages, and a DJ.  The Post Ride Street Party is open to the public. About Denver Bike Sharing Denver B-cycle is powered by Kaiser Permanente Colorado in association with a variety of community sponsors. Denver B-cycle is owned and operated by Denver Bike Sharing, a charitable, non-profit organization. Denver Bike Sharing serves as a catalyst for a fundamental transformation in thinking and behavior by operating a bike sharing system in Denver to enhance mobility while promoting all aspects of sustainability: quality of life, equity, the environment, economic development, and public health. To learn more about Denver Bike Sharing, the owner and operator of Denver B-cycle, visit denver.bcycle.com or call 303-825-3325. About Kaiser Permanente Colorado Kaiser Permanente Colorado is the state’s largest nonprofit health plan, working to improve the lives and health of all Coloradans for 48 years. We’re comprised of the Kaiser Foundation Health Plan of Colorado and the Colorado Permanente Medical Group — one of the state’s largest medical groups with more than 1,100 physicians. We provide comprehensive care for our 670,000 Kaiser Permanente Colorado members through 31 medical offices across the state — from Pueblo to Greeley and now in the mountains in Summit and Eagle counties. We’re also committed to our social mission and in 2015, proudly directed more than $124 million to community benefit programs to improve the health of all Coloradans. For more Kaiser Permanente news, visit kp.org/share or follow us @kpcolorado or like us facebook.com/kpcolorado. ##

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Media Release

Media Contacts:
Mark Stevens
mstevens@ecentral.com
720-328-5488 (office); 303-495-8699 (cell)

May 25, 2017

News Release

Denver B-Cycle Partners With Denver Century Ride

Denver B-cycle today announced a two-year partnership with Coldwell Banker Denver Century Ride, taking place this year on Saturday, June 17 along four courses that each feature excellent bike routes around the Denver metro area.  All four of the route options—100 miles, 85 miles, 50 miles and 25 miles—begin and end at The Shops at Northfield Stapleton (8340 Northfield Blvd.), are fully supported, and allow cyclists to discover Denver by bike as they wind through the city.

“The Denver Century Ride showcases how much progress Denver is making as an urban bike city,” said Denver B-cycle executive director Nick Bohnenkamp. “The routes feature some of our best infrastructure and how to get around.  The Century Ride also benefits bicycle organizations that are playing a key role in the ongoing improvements to the region’s bicycle infrastructure—and culture—we appreciate their vision and commitment.”

The Denver Century Ride benefits Bicycle Colorado, BikeDenver and Bike Jeffco. All three non-profit organizations advocate for the cycling community through a variety of means. In 2018, Denver B-cycle will be a non-profit partner and benefactor of the 25-mile ride option.

The 100-mile route is designed to help cyclists discover how easy it is to get out to the mountains by bike with the Downtown Denver skyline in full view and relish in the proximity of city and country.  The full 100-mile route highlights some of Denver’s bicycle commuter routes and casual riding areas including a challenging climb from Golden through Genesee Park.

To register and for complete details regarding routes visit http://denvercenturyride.com/. The day will end with a street party at Northfield Stapleton complete with a variety of food options, beer and beverages, and a DJ.  The Post Ride Street Party is open to the public.

About Denver Bike Sharing
Denver B-cycle is powered by Kaiser Permanente Colorado in association with a variety of community sponsors. Denver B-cycle is owned and operated by Denver Bike Sharing, a charitable, non-profit organization.

Denver Bike Sharing serves as a catalyst for a fundamental transformation in thinking and behavior by operating a bike sharing system in Denver to enhance mobility while promoting all aspects of sustainability: quality of life, equity, the environment, economic development, and public health.

To learn more about Denver Bike Sharing, the owner and operator of Denver B-cycle, visit denver.bcycle.com or call 303-825-3325.

About Kaiser Permanente Colorado
Kaiser Permanente Colorado is the state’s largest nonprofit health plan, working to improve the lives and health of all Coloradans for 48 years. We’re comprised of the Kaiser Foundation Health Plan of Colorado and the Colorado Permanente Medical Group — one of the state’s largest medical groups with more than 1,100 physicians. We provide comprehensive care for our 670,000 Kaiser Permanente Colorado members through 31 medical offices across the state — from Pueblo to Greeley and now in the mountains in Summit and Eagle counties. We’re also committed to our social mission and in 2015, proudly directed more than $124 million to community benefit programs to improve the health of all Coloradans. For more Kaiser Permanente news, visit kp.org/share or follow us @kpcolorado or like us facebook.com/kpcolorado.
##

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Guest Blog: Do’s and Don’t’s of the DCR http://denvercenturyride.com/guest-blog-dos-donts-dcr/ http://denvercenturyride.com/guest-blog-dos-donts-dcr/#comments Wed, 26 Apr 2017 21:32:05 +0000 http://denvercenturyride.com/?p=4058 By: Josh, a Stapleton Resident, Cyclist and Denver Century Ride Participant The Denver Century ride is quickly approaching. No matter how many miles you are planning on riding (there are lots of options) – here are a few Dos and Don’ts that will ensure maximum fun. DO service your bike Go beyond wiping off the cobwebs. Schedule a check-up at your local bike shop to make sure everything is working properly. Take a moment to gather the right tools for your seat bag so you can fix small issues that may arise during the ride. DON’T wing it Hopefully you’ve ventured out on a few longer weekend rides. Whatever mileage you are aiming for, this probably shouldn’t be the first time at the distance you are attempting. For me, just getting my rear in the saddle is important before a big ride. This could mean riding to work a few days a week, riding down to the farmers market or cruising the Sand Creek Trail in the evenings. The big takeaways here are conditioning your backside to be in the saddle for a while and conditioning enough that you aren’t huffing and puffing the whole way. DO give cues The fastest way to ruin your ride is crashing.  It’s really easy to give verbal cues or hand signals at the beginning of the ride, but it’s in the middle and end of the ride where accidents happen because of unpredictable moves or passes. With so many fun-loving people on the Denver Century Ride (with varying bike skills) – giving verbal cues and hand signals lets others know your intentions, and helps minimize bike-on-bike contact. DO talk to strangers This is the equivalent of stopping to smell the roses. A good friend of mine once said that he makes friends today the same way he did when he was 8 years old – by riding bikes.  You’ll be amazed at the people you meet. Here’s a tip – be unique, give people a reason to strike up conversation. The girl who rides a penny-farthing or the guy that wears a tutu will be talking to people all day. It could even be as simple as putting a bike license plate on your bike with your name on it. How do you start a conversation? “Hi” is a good place to start. DON’T try and break any records The Denver Century Ride isn’t a race. There isn’t a trophy waiting for you at the end. (Although the after-party is usually pretty rad.) Assume there’s always someone faster than you waiting to pass. And when things get congested, coasting for a few moments to wait for things to clear is OKAY. There will be plenty of opportunities to satisfy your need for speed. DO say thank you The collective Denver Century Ride crew is out there to make sure your day is the best it can be. Give a wave, a “thank you” or a high-five to the officers working the intersections, volunteers at the food/aid stations, and the countless event coordinators and food vendors. Get out there and enjoy the ride.

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By: Josh, a Stapleton Resident, Cyclist and Denver Century Ride Participant

The Denver Century ride is quickly approaching. No matter how many miles you are planning on riding (there are lots of options) – here are a few Dos and Don’ts that will ensure maximum fun.

Stapleton Denver Century Ride Blog

DO service your bike

Go beyond wiping off the cobwebs. Schedule a check-up at your local bike shop to make sure everything is working properly. Take a moment to gather the right tools for your seat bag so you can fix small issues that may arise during the ride.

DON’T wing it

Hopefully you’ve ventured out on a few longer weekend rides. Whatever mileage you are aiming for, this probably shouldn’t be the first time at the distance you are attempting. For me, just getting my rear in the saddle is important before a big ride. This could mean riding to work a few days a week, riding down to the farmers market or cruising the Sand Creek Trail in the evenings. The big takeaways here are conditioning your backside to be in the saddle for a while and conditioning enough that you aren’t huffing and puffing the whole way.

DO give cues

The fastest way to ruin your ride is crashing.  It’s really easy to give verbal cues or hand signals at the beginning of the ride, but it’s in the middle and end of the ride where accidents happen because of unpredictable moves or passes. With so many fun-loving people on the Denver Century Ride (with varying bike skills) – giving verbal cues and hand signals lets others know your intentions, and helps minimize bike-on-bike contact.

DO talk to strangers

This is the equivalent of stopping to smell the roses. A good friend of mine once said that he makes friends today the same way he did when he was 8 years old – by riding bikes.  You’ll be amazed at the people you meet. Here’s a tip – be unique, give people a reason to strike up conversation. The girl who rides a penny-farthing or the guy that wears a tutu will be talking to people all day. It could even be as simple as putting a bike license plate on your bike with your name on it. How do you start a conversation? “Hi” is a good place to start.

DON’T try and break any records

The Denver Century Ride isn’t a race. There isn’t a trophy waiting for you at the end. (Although the after-party is usually pretty rad.) Assume there’s always someone faster than you waiting to pass. And when things get congested, coasting for a few moments to wait for things to clear is OKAY. There will be plenty of opportunities to satisfy your need for speed.

DO say thank you

The collective Denver Century Ride crew is out there to make sure your day is the best it can be. Give a wave, a “thank you” or a high-five to the officers working the intersections, volunteers at the food/aid stations, and the countless event coordinators and food vendors.

Get out there and enjoy the ride.

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What’s new in 2017? A note from our Ride Director http://denvercenturyride.com/whats-new-in-2017-a-note-from-our-ride-director/ http://denvercenturyride.com/whats-new-in-2017-a-note-from-our-ride-director/#comments Wed, 07 Dec 2016 20:59:36 +0000 http://denvercenturyride.com/?p=3881 From the Ride Director What’s New in 2017 I was heading down 6th Avenue and all of sudden there was this big house I had never noticed before and I wondered how did I miss it since I travel this road every day and usually more than once a day?  I love that when it happens because I love discovering new things in the same area.   The 2017 Denver Century Ride is about discovering Metro Denver and seeing new things.   For the 100 mile route it is discovering how easy it is to get out to the mountains with Denver in full view and relishing the proximity of city and country.  For the 85 miles route it knowing you can enjoy the same route but joyfully miss the challenge of the climb as not everyone has the need to climb like a mountain goat.  For the 50 mile route it is realizing how far you can go and barely cross over the border of Denver into other cities and for the 25 mile route it is discovering that many parks hidden within neighborhoods since you will travel through a total of 8 parks. These may not be new roads for you but as you are riding you will see new things.  It is not a race it is a ride so stop and look around.   On a clear day there are over 10 places on the 85/100 mile routes where there is a perfect view of the Denver skyline.  In City Park covered by all routes there are 2 man-made lakes – Ferrell Lake and Duck Lake – and both lakes host large colonies of Black-crowned Night Herons and Double-crested Cormorants.   There are more Night Herons in City Park than any other place in Colorado.    You may not be a bird watcher but that is a very cool thing to have in the middle of a big city.  The 100 and the 85 will travel through the amazing town of Bow Mar.   Beautiful views and a wonderful community that comes out and cheers you on.   I promise that every participant will discover something new to them on the route, something they will want to go back to some other time to check out. This city route is designed to highlight some of the bike friendly routes that have been created due to the work of the bicycle advocacy groups supported by the ride – Bicycle Colorado, Bike Denver and Bike JeffCo.   There has been so much work done to improve the infrastructure of the roads to make it safer for cyclists BUT and it is a big BUT, we do still share the roads with vehicles.  This is a city ride and there are very few closed roads (Blake St in the morning and the Dam Road are the only closed roads).  You will ride on roads that have sharrows and more markings to guide both motor vehicles and cyclists on how to travel together but don’t forget the Denver Century Ride is about riding in Denver, listed as the 19th largest city in the United States.  And it is growing every day!  The Denver Century Ride is the only city ride in Colorado and it is a wonderful way to explore this city.   We hope that you join us on two wheels to explore and discover on where the mountains meet the plains.

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From the Ride Director
What’s New in 2017

from-ride-director-photo-1I was heading down 6th Avenue and all of sudden there was this big house I had never noticed before and I wondered how did I miss it since I travel this road every day and usually more than once a day?  I love that when it happens because I love discovering new things in the same area.   The 2017 Denver Century Ride is about discovering Metro Denver and seeing new things.   For the 100 mile route it is discovering how easy it is to get out to the mountains with Denver in full view and relishing the proximity of city and country.  For the 85 miles route it knowing you can enjoy the same route but joyfully miss the challenge of the climb as not everyone has the need to climb like a mountain goat.  For the 50 mile route it is realizing how far you can go and barely cross over the border of Denver into other cities and for the 25 mile route it is discovering that many parks hidden within neighborhoods since you will travel through a total of 8 parks.

from-ride-director-photo-2These may not be new roads for you but as you are riding you will see new things.  It is not a race it is a ride so stop and look around.   On a clear day there are over 10 places on the 85/100 mile routes where there is a perfect view of the Denver skyline.  In City Park covered by all routes there are 2 man-made lakes – Ferrell Lake and Duck Lake – and both lakes host large colonies of Black-crowned Night Herons and Double-crested Cormorants.   There are more Night Herons in City Park than any other place in Colorado.    You may not be a bird watcher but that is a very cool thing to have in the middle of a big city.  The 100 and the 85 will travel through the amazing town of Bow Mar.   Beautiful views and a wonderful community that comes out and cheers you on.   I promise that every participant will discover something new to them on the route, something they will want to go back to some other time to check out.

This city route is designed to highlight some of the bike friendly routes that have been created due to the work of the bicycle advocacy groups supported by the ride – Bicycle Colorado, Bike Denver and Bike JeffCo.   There has been so much work done to improve the infrastructure of the roads to make it safer for cyclists BUT and it is a big BUT, we do still share the roads with vehicles.  This is a city ride and there are very few closed roads (Blake St in the morning and the Dam Road are the only closed roads).  You will ride on roads that have sharrows and more markings to guide both motor vehicles and cyclists on how to travel together but don’t forget the Denver Century Ride is about riding in Denver, listed as the 19th largest city in the United States.  And it is growing every day!  The Denver Century Ride is the only city ride in Colorado and it is a wonderful way to explore this city.   We hope that you join us on two wheels to explore and discover on where the mountains meet the plains.

from-ride-director-photo-3

Dee-Signature

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From the Ride Director: June 2016 Edition http://denvercenturyride.com/from-the-ride-director-june-2016-edition/ http://denvercenturyride.com/from-the-ride-director-june-2016-edition/#comments Wed, 08 Jun 2016 16:37:43 +0000 http://denvercenturyride.com/?p=3746 Can you believe the DCR is less than 2 weeks away?   Part of me can’t but then again since I am now spending almost every waking hour on some aspect of the Ride I can!   There are a lot of final arrangements that have to be made with support staff, police departments, municipalities and the like.   Do you realize that this route is never more than 25 miles from the Start yet we go through 4 counties and 14 cities/towns?  That is pretty wild if you really think about it in those terms! As you know, this is an urban based ride so you do see more population (i.e.  cars, people, commerce) than on other organized rides that are based in more rural settings.   To help you navigate through some of the more densely populated areas we have hired over 40 police details and we have over 50 course marshals.    This is in addition to the Route Managers, SAG Support and the extensive signage on the route.   We definitely work hard to make it a safe and fun event for you but we do ask that you also do your part to keep it a safe ride. In Aurora, we have 20 officers for 12 miles of route and one of the reasons is that cyclists have the reputation for not stopping at intersections, so the fear is that if one cyclist blasts through an intersection without stopping the “peloton” will just follow.    While I don’t necessarily agree having more faith in all of you, and especially since it is later in the ride, there is always that concern.   Here is the important points to think about: It is a Rules of the Road ride. There are only 2 locations where the road is closed: Blake Street between 20th and 15th and the Dam Road.   If a uniformed officer does not direct you through the intersection then you have to stop. Your choices affect others because they may just follow your lead and because it tells the community that cyclists are indeed reckless. This not only jeopardizes the safety of others but the ability of organized rides to travel through some areas. I realize that I sound a bit like a broken record but I do take your safety very seriously. So, while I am working with the support crews on these details here are a few things you can do to prepare for your ride: Get your bike ready! Has it been tuned up?  Some of our participating bike shops are offering discounts Beeline Bikes (a mobile bike shop that comes to you!) Coupon code: DEN100 gives you $20 off! Campus Cycles – if you are picking up your packet at Campus Cycles you will be receiving a $10 gift coupon so you can use that for a tune-up or an extra tube! Aid Stations: If you have a severe allergy we do encourage you to pack an energy bar or two in your jersey in case we don’t have what you need at the Aid Stations.  Each Aid Station will have Pep Pod for hydration, Clif Products (not sure of exactly what products until they are delivered!), fruit and some other snack items.  But again, if you have a severe allergy please be prepared so you don’t bonk! Recruit a friend! Nervous about the ride? Then recruit a friend to do it with you so you can mutually encourage each other along the way! You will hear from me again before the ride but don’t hesitate to reach out if there are any questions I can help answer!   Have fun training and see you soon!         Deirdre Moynihan Ride Director Email:  RideDirector@denverCenturyRide.Com  

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From-the-Ride-Director-Header

Can you believe the DCR is less than 2 weeks away?   Part of me can’t but then again since I am now spending almost every waking hour on some aspect of the Ride I can!   There are a lot of final arrangements that have to be made with support staff, police departments, municipalities and the like.   Do you realize that this route is never more than 25 miles from the Start yet we go through 4 counties and 14 cities/towns?  That is pretty wild if you really think about it in those terms!

As you know, this is an urban based ride so you do see more population (i.e.  cars, people, commerce) than on other organized rides that are based in more rural settings.   To help you navigate through some of the more densely populated areas we have hired over 40 police details and we have over 50 course marshals.    This is in addition to the Route Managers, SAG Support and the extensive signage on the route.   We definitely work hard to make it a safe and fun event for you but we do ask that you also do your part to keep it a safe ride.

In Aurora, we have 20 officers for 12 miles of route and one of the reasons is that cyclists have the reputation for not stopping at intersections, so the fear is that if one cyclist blasts through an intersection without stopping the “peloton” will just follow.    While I don’t necessarily agree having more faith in all of you, and especially since it is later in the ride, there is always that concern.   Here is the important points to think about:

  • It is a Rules of the Road ride. There are only 2 locations where the road is closed: Blake Street between 20th and 15th and the Dam Road.   If a uniformed officer does not direct you through the intersection then you have to stop.
  • Your choices affect others because they may just follow your lead and because it tells the community that cyclists are indeed reckless. This not only jeopardizes the safety of others but the ability of organized rides to travel through some areas.

I realize that I sound a bit like a broken record but I do take your safety very seriously.

So, while I am working with the support crews on these details here are a few things you can do to prepare for your ride:

  • Get your bike ready! Has it been tuned up?  Some of our participating bike shops are offering discounts
    • Beeline Bikes (a mobile bike shop that comes to you!) Coupon code: DEN100 gives you $20 off!
    • Campus Cycles – if you are picking up your packet at Campus Cycles you will be receiving a $10 gift coupon so you can use that for a tune-up or an extra tube!
  • Aid Stations: If you have a severe allergy we do encourage you to pack an energy bar or two in your jersey in case we don’t have what you need at the Aid Stations.  Each Aid Station will have Pep Pod for hydration, Clif Products (not sure of exactly what products until they are delivered!), fruit and some other snack items.  But again, if you have a severe allergy please be prepared so you don’t bonk!
  • Recruit a friend! Nervous about the ride? Then recruit a friend to do it with you so you can mutually encourage each other along the way!

You will hear from me again before the ride but don’t hesitate to reach out if there are any questions I can help answer!

 

Have fun training and see you soon!

Dee-Signature

 

 

 

 

Deirdre Moynihan
Ride Director
Email:  RideDirector@denverCenturyRide.Com

 

DSC_0096 DSC_0106 DSC_0112 Only Blake St and the Dam Road will be closed

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FREE Coach Led Training Ride – June 5th 1p-3p http://denvercenturyride.com/free-coach-led-training-ride-june-5th-1p-3p/ http://denvercenturyride.com/free-coach-led-training-ride-june-5th-1p-3p/#comments Fri, 03 Jun 2016 20:00:25 +0000 http://denvercenturyride.com/?p=3742 This weekend’s weather looks like a great chance to get out and ride. Why not join our Official Training Partner, Inspired Training Center and Coach Sue while she explores some of the 1/2 Century route. Date: Sunday, June 5 Time: 1:00-3:00 What: Explore the northeast portion of the half century. Details: Meet at the King Soopers parking lot at 104th and Chambers Rd. We’ll ride the northeast portion of the course, around Barr Lake. Folks need to be able to ride a comfortable 13 mph for this ride. Look for Coach Sue wearing her red Inspired Training Center kit, near her blue Nissan Frontier. Contact coach Sue at sue@inspiredtrainingcenter.com with questions.

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Training-Ride-2

This weekend’s weather looks like a great chance to get out and ride. Why not join our Official Training Partner, Inspired Training Center and Coach Sue while she explores some of the 1/2 Century route.

Date: Sunday, June 5
Time: 1:00-3:00
What: Explore the northeast portion of the half century.

Details: Meet at the King Soopers parking lot at 104th and Chambers Rd. We’ll ride the northeast portion of the course, around Barr Lake. Folks need to be able to ride a comfortable 13 mph for this ride.

Look for Coach Sue wearing her red Inspired Training Center kit, near her blue Nissan Frontier. Contact coach Sue at sue@inspiredtrainingcenter.com with questions.

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From The Ride Director: March 2016 Edition http://denvercenturyride.com/from-the-ride-director-march-2016-edition/ http://denvercenturyride.com/from-the-ride-director-march-2016-edition/#comments Tue, 22 Mar 2016 16:26:32 +0000 http://denvercenturyride.com/?p=3682 One of the great joys of riding in an organized bicycle event is all the support that is provided out on the route.  There are aid stations with hydration, nutrition, port-o-potties, medical and mechanics approximately every 15-20 miles.  On the route there are Support and Gear Vehicles (SAG Wagons) that carry hydration and nutrition, tubes, pumps, an extra seat in the car if you need a ride and of course, good cheer.  There are also mechanics on the road should you run into a problem between aid stations. All that support makes it so much easier to go for a long distance ride. But don’t let all the support stop you from being prepared! Here are some tips for you to make sure you and your bike are ready for the journey: Bicycle Maintenance: Spring Cleaning!  Give your bike a good cleaning and tune-up. If you are not sure how to do all that bring your bike to your local bike shop.  Many bike shops have specials going on at this time of year for a tune-up. Bike Shop Partner Evergreen Bike Shop has provided a great list for you! Practice fixing a flat! Flats are inevitable and it helps if you know how to fix your own flat. We have support on the route but sometimes you have to wait for the SAG Wagon or Mechanic to get to you. If you don’t know how to do it stop by one of our Bike Shop partners: Campus Cycles on April 23rd for a Fix a Flat class.   It will help you on the ride and just out and about on your own rides. Bring the Basics: Don’t load up your bike and pockets with too much stuff as it will weigh you down but you should have a few things with you: spare inner tube tire levers patch kit mini-pump folding multi-tool rain gear (check the weather!) cell phone identification/money/insurance card Even if you are not familiar with how to fix a flat tire yourself or make basic adjustments, having the necessary tools and supplies is a step in the right direction, and one of the other cyclists might be able to help get you going. Again, we are out on the route providing support for you but it is always a great idea to make sure you and your bike are prepared for the day.  It will make the day all that much better! Ride Safely,

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Header-March

One of the great joys of riding in an organized bicycle event is all the support that is provided out on the route.  There are aid stations with hydration, nutrition, port-o-potties, medical and mechanics approximately every 15-20 miles.  On the route there are Support and Gear Vehicles (SAG Wagons) that carry hydration and nutrition, tubes, pumps, an extra seat in the car if you need a ride and of course, good cheer.  There are also mechanics on the road should you run into a problem between aid stations. All that support makes it so much easier to go for a long distance ride.

But don’t let all the support stop you from being prepared! Here are some tips for you to make sure you and your bike are ready for the journey:

  1. Bicycle Maintenance: Spring Cleaning!  Give your bike a good cleaning and tune-up. If you are not sure how to do all that bring your bike to your local bike shop.  Many bike shops have specials going on at this time of year for a tune-up.
  2. Practice fixing a flat! Flats are inevitable and it helps if you know how to fix your own flat. We have support on the route but sometimes you have to wait for the SAG Wagon or Mechanic to get to you. If you don’t know how to do it stop by one of our Bike Shop partners: Campus Cycles on April 23rd for a Fix a Flat class.   It will help you on the ride and just out and about on your own rides.
  3. Bring the Basics: Don’t load up your bike and pockets with too much stuff as it will weigh you down but you should have a few things with you:
    • spare inner tube
    • tire levers
    • patch kit
    • mini-pump
    • folding multi-tool
    • rain gear (check the weather!)
    • cell phone
    • identification/money/insurance card

Even if you are not familiar with how to fix a flat tire yourself or make basic adjustments, having the necessary tools and supplies is a step in the right direction, and one of the other cyclists might be able to help get you going.

Again, we are out on the route providing support for you but it is always a great idea to make sure you and your bike are prepared for the day.  It will make the day all that much better!

Ride Safely,

Dee-Signature

Safety-First-Images

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Training Blog: Push http://denvercenturyride.com/training-blog-push/ http://denvercenturyride.com/training-blog-push/#comments Mon, 21 Mar 2016 16:35:26 +0000 http://denvercenturyride.com/?p=3673 Push By: Fleur Alvarez Six minutes may not seem like a very long time.  And framed within the vastness of the universe, it isn’t.  However, when you factor in the sensation that your heart is going burst out of your chest, your legs seem to be burning with strength of a million red hot suns, and your mind and stomach are conspiring to ditch it all to go get a burrito the size of Jabba The Hut smothered in molè…six minutes then seems like a very very long time.  These are times when we push!  Push all those nagging aches and internal voices to the wayside.  Push our spirit to continue.  Drive our legs like the pistons that they are.  Drive our will “ever on and on”*. You’ll notice I say: “we” and “our” here a lot.  And that is because we all collectively share in the same spirit, and drive.  We share in the same agony and the same triumph. There is some pretty serious comfort in this.  When sweat is dripping down my face and I am taking those deeply seated breaths as far into my diaphragm as they can possibly go; I revel in the fact that countless other have been exactly where I find myself.  That at any given moment there is a cyclist somewhere out in our wide world who is pushing, just as I am.  That someone too, is ignoring doubt and pedaling on towards that tiny increase in greatness we gain with every ride. Every single time without fail, when I arrive at these “pushable” moments and choose to give the bike everything I’ve got, I am amazed at just how much is actually there.  Every. Single. Time.   Rewind my life back two and a half or three years ago and there would have been no way (and I mean NO WAY!) I would have even thought of trying, let alone pushing myself.  I was operating under the false assumption that I was only capable of a finite amount.  Yet, what I am repeatedly discovering is that by pushing that little more every time what I am actually capable of becomes infinite.  Now, if you have read my previous online essays you may be noticing a theme.  Good.  Because there is one.  If cycling has taught me nothing else, it has taught me this: I CAN DO IT.  Cycling has repeatedly pummeled me across the head with this awareness.  I am by nature an obstinate person, so it has admittedly taken a bit for me to full receive and accept this fact.  Don’t waste your time dwelling in doubt, as I did.  Accept your infinite power.  Accept that when you take up any and every opportunity to give more, to the bike, to yourself…that what you ultimately gain is tenfold compared to whatever temporary physical or mental travail you may endure. This is a key truth that we must accept in order for us to continually push. Okay, back to those six minutes.  Those teeny tiny six minutes.  Those six minutes that stand between you and that oh so yearned for increase in your might as a cyclist.  Quite often at Inspired Training Center our rides consist of many intervals.  The clever and blessed souls who create these mapped out plans of just what our legs will go through on any given session invariably give us enough of a challenge so that we may grow.  And lately it seems that the six minute block is their method of choice.  Not always, sometimes it is one, two, five, or even eight minutes of “Intense Effort” as they so affectionately call it.  Within these blocks your effort will tend to build upon itself until you reach a zenith; there you push with an energy that comes from the reserve’s, reserve’s, reserve.  Kind of rad, right?  Totally!  Especially when you think about how much more untapped fuel you harbor lying in wait for just the right moment to spring forth and conquer that next minute, hill, or mile.  Just waiting for us to push.  We stand at this precipice daily, sometimes even minute by minute, and the choice to push is just standing by eager for us to seize it!  Push, my friends, PUSH! *“The Road goes ever on and on Down from the door where it began. Now far ahead the Road has gone, And I must follow, if I can, Pursuing it with eager feet, Until it joins some larger way Where many paths and errands meet. And whither then? I cannot say” -J.R.R. Tolkien  

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Push
By: Fleur Alvarez

Six minutes may not seem like a very long time.  And framed within the vastness of the universe, it isn’t.  However, when you factor in the sensation that your heart is going burst out of your chest, your legs seem to be burning with strength of a million red hot suns, and your mind and stomach are conspiring to ditch it all to go get a burrito the size of Jabba The Hut smothered in molè…six minutes then seems like a very very long time.  These are times when we push!  Push all those nagging aches and internal voices to the wayside.  Push our spirit to continue.  Drive our legs like the pistons that they are.  Drive our will “ever on and on”*.

You’ll notice I say: “we” and “our” here a lot.  And that is because we all collectively share in the same spirit, and drive.  We share in the same agony and the same triumph. There is some pretty serious comfort in this.  When sweat is dripping down my face and I am taking those deeply seated breaths as far into my diaphragm as they can possibly go; I revel in the fact that countless other have been exactly where I find myself.  That at any given moment there is a cyclist somewhere out in our wide world who is pushing, just as I am.  That someone too, is ignoring doubt and pedaling on towards that tiny increase in greatness we gain with every ride.

Every single time without fail, when I arrive at these “pushable” moments and choose to give the bike everything I’ve got, I am amazed at just how much is actually there.  Every. Single. Time.   Rewind my life back two and a half or three years ago and there would have been no way (and I mean NO WAY!) I would have even thought of trying, let alone pushing myself.  I was operating under the false assumption that I was only capable of a finite amount.  Yet, what I am repeatedly discovering is that by pushing that little more every time what I am actually capable of becomes infinite.  Now, if you have read my previous online essays you may be noticing a theme.  Good.  Because there is one.  If cycling has taught me nothing else, it has taught me this: I CAN DO IT.  Cycling has repeatedly pummeled me across the head with this awareness.  I am by nature an obstinate person, so it has admittedly taken a bit for me to full receive and accept this fact.  Don’t waste your time dwelling in doubt, as I did.  Accept your infinite power.  Accept that when you take up any and every opportunity to give more, to the bike, to yourself…that what you ultimately gain is tenfold compared to whatever temporary physical or mental travail you may endure. This is a key truth that we must accept in order for us to continually push.

Okay, back to those six minutes.  Those teeny tiny six minutes.  Those six minutes that stand between you and that oh so yearned for increase in your might as a cyclist.  Quite often at Inspired Training Center our rides consist of many intervals.  The clever and blessed souls who create these mapped out plans of just what our legs will go through on any given session invariably give us enough of a challenge so that we may grow.  And lately it seems that the six minute block is their method of choice.  Not always, sometimes it is one, two, five, or even eight minutes of “Intense Effort” as they so affectionately call it.  Within these blocks your effort will tend to build upon itself until you reach a zenith; there you push with an energy that comes from the reserve’s, reserve’s, reserve.  Kind of rad, right?  Totally!  Especially when you think about how much more untapped fuel you harbor lying in wait for just the right moment to spring forth and conquer that next minute, hill, or mile.  Just waiting for us to push.  We stand at this precipice daily, sometimes even minute by minute, and the choice to push is just standing by eager for us to seize it!  Push, my friends, PUSH!

*“The Road goes ever on and on
Down from the door where it began.
Now far ahead the Road has gone,
And I must follow, if I can,
Pursuing it with eager feet,
Until it joins some larger way
Where many paths and errands meet.
And whither then? I cannot say”

-J.R.R. Tolkien

 

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From The Ride Director: February 2016 Edition http://denvercenturyride.com/from-the-ride-director-february-2016-edition/ http://denvercenturyride.com/from-the-ride-director-february-2016-edition/#comments Tue, 23 Feb 2016 18:10:55 +0000 http://denvercenturyride.com/?p=3660 At this point in the planning, I have the official meetings with the municipalities and police departments along the route to not only get their permission but also their valuable input. They know the community, the traffic flow on any day and time and where the trouble spots are along the way. Of course, that means that I do end of tweaking the route a bit here and there but it always good changes. In my meetings I assure everyone that it is a Rules of the Road Ride not a Race. Rules of the Road Ride means that participants follow the standard rules of the road especially stop signs, red lights and ride no more than two abreast, returning to single-file if riding two abreast would impede the flow of traffic. There are no closed roads on the Denver Century Ride. Now, because the Denver Century Ride is an urban based ride there is more traffic and more stops.  To ensure your safety and reduce the number of stops, we contract with police departments and the Colorado State Patrol to be at intersections. This is especially true in Downtown where the Denver Police Department are on hand to let your ride through Blake Street with no stopping. It is awesome and we are happy to make that happen. However, if there is no official, meaning officer of the law whether local or the Colorado State Patrol, that is directing you to go ahead and not stop, then you need to stop at all stop signs and red lights. I can hear you now telling me but what about the Idaho Stop Law, the law in Idaho that allows cyclists to yield instead of stop?  It is a good point, and many bicycle advocates are using their voices to help pass a similar law in Colorado BUT we have work to do to get it passed!  Right now, it is only legal in Aspen, Breckenridge and Summit County. The good news is that the Denver Century Ride supports 3 bicycle advocacy groups that believe in the Idaho Stop Law:  Bicycle Colorado, Bike JeffCo and BikeDenver.  I encourage you to add your voice to the advocacy efforts to help move things along. We post cycling advocacy updates from these groups on our Facebook page. Best way to not miss anything is to “like” the page so you don’t miss anything! My priority is to ensure you have a safe and fun day on the bike exploring the Metro Denver area but I will need your help! Let’s work together! Feel free to reach out if you have questions, thoughts, etc. I am always happy to hear from you! Ride on, Helpful Riding Tips

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From-The-Ride-Director-Feb-Header

At this point in the planning, I have the official meetings with the municipalities and police departments along the route to not only get their permission but also their valuable input. They know the community, the traffic flow on any day and time and where the trouble spots are along the way. Of course, that means that I do end of tweaking the route a bit here and there but it always good changes. In my meetings I assure everyone that it is a Rules of the Road Ride not a Race. Rules of the Road Ride means that participants follow the standard rules of the road especially stop signs, red lights and ride no more than two abreast, returning to single-file if riding two abreast would impede the flow of traffic. There are no closed roads on the Denver Century Ride.

Now, because the Denver Century Ride is an urban based ride there is more traffic and more stops.  To ensure your safety and reduce the number of stops, we contract with police departments and the Colorado State Patrol to be at intersections. This is especially true in Downtown where the Denver Police Department are on hand to let your ride through Blake Street with no stopping. It is awesome and we are happy to make that happen.

However, if there is no official, meaning officer of the law whether local or the Colorado State Patrol, that is directing you to go ahead and not stop, then you need to stop at all stop signs and red lights. I can hear you now telling me but what about the Idaho Stop Law, the law in Idaho that allows cyclists to yield instead of stop?  It is a good point, and many bicycle advocates are using their voices to help pass a similar law in Colorado BUT we have work to do to get it passed!  Right now, it is only legal in Aspen, Breckenridge and Summit County. The good news is that the Denver Century Ride supports 3 bicycle advocacy groups that believe in the Idaho Stop Law:  Bicycle Colorado, Bike JeffCo and BikeDenver.  I encourage you to add your voice to the advocacy efforts to help move things along. We post cycling advocacy updates from these groups on our Facebook page. Best way to not miss anything is to “like” the page so you don’t miss anything!

My priority is to ensure you have a safe and fun day on the bike exploring the Metro Denver area but I will need your help! Let’s work together!

Feel free to reach out if you have questions, thoughts, etc. I am always happy to hear from you!

Ride on,
Dee-Signature

Helpful Riding Tips
From-The-Ride-Director-Feb-Pictures

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Training Blog – Threshold http://denvercenturyride.com/training-blog-threshold/ http://denvercenturyride.com/training-blog-threshold/#comments Fri, 05 Feb 2016 18:32:44 +0000 http://denvercenturyride.com/?p=3646 Threshold by Fleur Alvarez One thing I’ve found continually running through my mind as I venture on this path towards constantly becoming* a cyclist is: “What do I have left?”  What do I have left to give?  What do I have left to push?  What do I have left to dig up from gut and shove into my legs?  Over the past couple of weeks this has been my steady state of mind.  I want to give my all…but how much do I have? Two and a half weeks ago I went into Inspired Training Center for something they call a “FUNCTIONAL THRESHOLD POWER TEST” (in summation: a warm up ride that culminates to a 20 minute block where you increasingly give everything you’ve got.)  I had built this up in my mind to be something very intimidating; something that would leave me bloodied and bruised like some victorious Viking Maiden Warrior, holding my bike aloft my head as if my war axe!  Happily, I was almost totally wrong.  Intimidating?  Not at all.  In fact, as soon as I hopped on my saddle and Coach Sue was talking me through what we were about to do I was completely at ease.  I was amongst my people; friends.  I was on my bike; a faithful mount.  This wasn’t about judgement nor was it about holding myself up to some fictitious measuring stick of what makes a cyclist.  This was about me and, as I discovered, my heart.  Once things sufficiently warmed up and I was halfway through the 20 minute melee, it wasn’t my legs or my chest I was battling, it was my mind. Throughout our lives we run into a lot of “noes”, a lot of other people telling us what we are and are not capable of.  Somewhere along the line the fear of failure becomes instilled in our minds and in turn creates a huge barrier that stands between us and our aspirations.  All of the “what if’s” cloud our vision and often times feel more real to us than the reality of the minutes, hours, days, months, and years we have lovingly poured into our dreams.  I am here to tell you straight up, this is a lie.  These are the moments where we have to allow our hearts to win out over our minds.  It’s that extraordinarily easy, as well as that extraordinarily difficult at the same time.  Surely, our minds are key in the cycling process.  Always check in, always listen when your mind is telling you legit reasons to maybe slow down, ease off, or even dismount and “live to ride another day”, as it were.  This cannot be overstated.  However, there are many many times that your mind will decide to haze you…cause you to needlessly doubt your veracity.  And it is these times when your heart must step in.  After all, true vehemence is born of the pounding visceral heart, not of the calculated cerebral mind.  Trust this.  I promise you it will take you so much further than thought possible. Because I am one of those people whom happens to have a rabid shrew whose downed about 12 shots of perfectly “crema’d” Italian espresso turning the cranks of my thought, (seriously, look up these little buggers on YouTube, they never stop!), all of this and more was rushing through my brain those last ten minutes of the Functional Threshold Power Test.  My head was giving sway to doubt, I started asking myself: if I had what it takes to finish?  How could I go on?  Will I let everyone down?  Frequently during these hard moments we are graced with acute clarity…my heart began projecting images of resolve and comfort; seeing myself screaming downhill out of Castle Pines after being lost for the better of two hours, my first time walking into the training center and seeing the reassuring smiles of my new coaches, and the look of patience and joy on Tom’s face (from my bike shop, Lucky Bikes) as he explains for the third-plus time on how to execute a common repair.  This is what stays the heart, and the heart is what stays the legs.  My full clarity was this: 1) The only way I could let these people down is by not trying. 2) Not trying will never be an option. And 3) “What I have left” is perpetually limitless. So, when next you find yourself affixed to the line of your assumed threshold remember this: Limitations do not exist for the heart and the heart of a cyclist harbors no threshold. You always have more to give and, just between you and me, when I stepped down off my bike I kind of did feel like a Viking Maiden Warrior, ya know, just a little.   Written by: Fleur Alvarez, First time Denver Century Rider *”becoming” is used here in the philosophical sense; Heraclitus of Ephesus wrote “panta rhei, os potamòs” meaning, “the whole flows, as a river,” or figuratively as “everything flows, nothing stands still.”  These words perfectly embody my approach to being, or better constantly becoming a cyclist.  

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]]>
Threshold
by Fleur Alvarez

One thing I’ve found continually running through my mind as I venture on this path towards constantly becoming* a cyclist is: “What do I have left?”  What do I have left to give?  What do I have left to push?  What do I have left to dig up from gut and shove into my legs?  Over the past couple of weeks this has been my steady state of mind.  I want to give my all…but how much do I have?

Two and a half weeks ago I went into Inspired Training Center for something they call a “FUNCTIONAL THRESHOLD POWER TEST” (in summation: a warm up ride that culminates to a 20 minute block where you increasingly give everything you’ve got.)  I had built this up in my mind to be something very intimidating; something that would leave me bloodied and bruised like some victorious Viking Maiden Warrior, holding my bike aloft my head as if my war axe!  Happily, I was almost totally wrong.  Intimidating?  Not at all.  In fact, as soon as I hopped on my saddle and Coach Sue was talking me through what we were about to do I was completely at ease.  I was amongst my people; friends.  I was on my bike; a faithful mount.  This wasn’t about judgement nor was it about holding myself up to some fictitious measuring stick of what makes a cyclist.  This was about me and, as I discovered, my heart.  Once things sufficiently warmed up and I was halfway through the 20 minute melee, it wasn’t my legs or my chest I was battling, it was my mind.

Throughout our lives we run into a lot of “noes”, a lot of other people telling us what we are and are not capable of.  Somewhere along the line the fear of failure becomes instilled in our minds and in turn creates a huge barrier that stands between us and our aspirations.  All of the “what if’s” cloud our vision and often times feel more real to us than the reality of the minutes, hours, days, months, and years we have lovingly poured into our dreams.  I am here to tell you straight up, this is a lie.  These are the moments where we have to allow our hearts to win out over our minds.  It’s that extraordinarily easy, as well as that extraordinarily difficult at the same time.  Surely, our minds are key in the cycling process.  Always check in, always listen when your mind is telling you legit reasons to maybe slow down, ease off, or even dismount and “live to ride another day”, as it were.  This cannot be overstated.  However, there are many many times that your mind will decide to haze you…cause you to needlessly doubt your veracity.  And it is these times when your heart must step in.  After all, true vehemence is born of the pounding visceral heart, not of the calculated cerebral mind.  Trust this.  I promise you it will take you so much further than thought possible.

Because I am one of those people whom happens to have a rabid shrew whose downed about 12 shots of perfectly “crema’d” Italian espresso turning the cranks of my thought, (seriously, look up these little buggers on YouTube, they never stop!), all of this and more was rushing through my brain those last ten minutes of the Functional Threshold Power Test.  My head was giving sway to doubt, I started asking myself: if I had what it takes to finish?  How could I go on?  Will I let everyone down?  Frequently during these hard moments we are graced with acute clarity…my heart began projecting images of resolve and comfort; seeing myself screaming downhill out of Castle Pines after being lost for the better of two hours, my first time walking into the training center and seeing the reassuring smiles of my new coaches, and the look of patience and joy on Tom’s face (from my bike shop, Lucky Bikes) as he explains for the third-plus time on how to execute a common repair.  This is what stays the heart, and the heart is what stays the legs.  My full clarity was this: 1) The only way I could let these people down is by not trying. 2) Not trying will never be an option. And 3) “What I have left” is perpetually limitless.

So, when next you find yourself affixed to the line of your assumed threshold remember this: Limitations do not exist for the heart and the heart of a cyclist harbors no threshold.

You always have more to give and, just between you and me, when I stepped down off my bike I kind of did feel like a Viking Maiden Warrior, ya know, just a little.

InspiredFleur

 

Written by: Fleur Alvarez, First time Denver Century Rider

*”becoming” is used here in the philosophical sense; Heraclitus of Ephesus wrote “panta rhei, os potamòs” meaning, “the whole flows, as a river,” or figuratively as “everything flows, nothing stands still.”  These words perfectly embody my approach to being, or better constantly becoming a cyclist.

 

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